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James Teasdale

James Teasdale

2018 Lecturer in English

[email protected]

B.A., University of Oxford, 2011
M.A., University of Rome "La Sapienza," 2016
Ph.D., University of Rome "La Sapienza," 2021

Prof. Teasdale is an Anglo-Irish doctor of Sociology who grew up in West Yorkshire in the North of England. After attending Catholic primary and secondary school in his native Leeds, Prof. Teasdale went on to study Modern History at the University of Oxford. Particularly interested in the intersections between race and gender in language, his undergraduate thesis on Early Modern England’s depiction of Sub-Saharan Africans and Native Americans would later be published as a book under the title ‘Unruly Women, Unruly Race.’ This interest in the deployment of language in the construction of ‘Otherness’ continued throughout a Master’s degree in Development and Finance and a Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Sapienza, Rome.

Prof. Teasdale’s current research interests revolve around the semiotics of media, with a particular focus on the presentation of migrants in print newspapers. Deploying a mix of frame analysis and cognitive psychology Prof. Teasdale, in his doctoral work, attempted to investigate how migrants and migration were depicted, and how this depiction changed, in the run-up to and fallout of the Brexit campaign and referendum in Britain. Overlapping qualitative, quantitative, inductive, and deductive enquiry within a computer-based text mining approach, this work demonstrates how geographical and demographical factors coloured this depiction of ‘Others’ in Modern Britain.

Currently, these research interests have manifested themselves in Prof. Teasdale’s capacity as an academic instructor most specifically in the form of a class on Text Mining at John Cabot University and the sociology of Crime and Deviance for the University of California in Rome. The former aims to help students understand how machine learning and quantitative investigation of texts cannot only prove useful as tools but can also be invaluable for wider and more tangible qualitative conclusions. The latter is a course structured around the primary understanding the crime and deviance are not found ready-made in society but are the products of one group of human beings labelling and degrading another. Prof. Teasdale also teaches English composition at all levels, with a keen focus on helping students deploy academic English effectively and efficiently as they aim to capture and exhibit their own interests and research for others.

Apart from these academic interests in language, and the study of language, Prof. Teasdale enjoys writing (poorly) short stories, reading fiction from the genre of Magical Realism, and is an avid player of the Football Manager game series (poorly).